November 28, 2020

Circuit mechanisms for the maintenance and manipulation of information in working memory

Persistent activity is problematic as a working memory (WM) mechanism. When WMs are in a persistent active state, they are easy to disrupt by distractions, additional inputs etc. Using modeling, Freedman and crew show that during simple WM maintenance, neural activity is transient, not persistent. This makes sense because the less often memories are in an active state, the better they are protected from disruption. However, when working memories must be manipulated and changed, the activity is more persistent. This makes sense because you want memories to be in a labile, changeable, state when you are manipulating them.

Circuit mechanisms for the maintenance and manipulation of information in working memory
Nicolas Y. Masse, Guangyu R. Yang, H. Francis Song, Xiao-Jing Wang & David J. Freedman

For further reading see:
Lundqvist, M., Herman, P., and Miller, E.K. (2018)  Working Memory: Delay Activity, Yes! Persistent Activity? Maybe not. Journal of Neuroscience, 8 August 2018, 38 (32) 7013-7019; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2485-17.2018.  View PDF

Miller, E.K., Lundqvist, L., and Bastos, A.M. (2018) Working Memory 2.0  Neuron,  DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2018.09.023  View PDF

Circuit mechanisms for the maintenance and manipulation of information in working memory
Nicolas Y. Masse, Guangyu R. Yang, H. Francis Song, Xiao-Jing Wang & David J. Freedman

For further reading see:
Lundqvist, M., Herman, P., and Miller, E.K. (2018)  Working Memory: Delay Activity, Yes! Persistent Activity? Maybe not. Journal of Neuroscience, 8 August 2018, 38 (32) 7013-7019; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2485-17.2018.  View PDF

Miller, E.K., Lundqvist, L., and Bastos, A.M. (2018) Working Memory 2.0  Neuron,  DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2018.09.023  View PDF

Miller Lab

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